Sung Hyun Park Wins U.S. Women’s Open, Edging an Amateur

She has the nickname Dak Gong, an informal phrase that can be translated as “Shut up and attack.”

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Feng Shanshan of China, who led for most of the event, had a triple-bogey 8 on the 18th and fell into a tie for fifth.

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Doug Mills/The New York Times

“Not like other Koreans, I am more aggressive in my game,” Park said through an interpreter. “I focus on my attack and being aggressive. And I like that name.”

The triumph for Park, her first major title and her first victory on the L.P.G.A. Tour, represented a significant breakthrough. With her 11-under 277, she defeated Choi by two strokes to earn the largest prize in the history of women’s golf, $900,000.

But there was considerable irony embedded in the final leaderboard. Playing under the gaze of the club’s owner, President Trump, who preaches “America first,” golfers from the United States failed to finish among the top 10 in this tournament for the first time.

Trump did not attend the victory ceremony, but he applauded the top two finishers as they passed under his box.

“I flew all the way here from Korea, long distance, and then on top of that the United States president clapped for me and cheered for me,” Choi said. “I was touched.”

Marina Alex, from Wayne, N.J., about 40 miles away, was the top American finisher, in a tie for 11th. Paula Creamer’s seventh-place tie in 2012, behind six non-Americans, represented the previous United States low point at the Open.

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Cristie Kerr of the United States finished tied for 19th.

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Doug Mills/The New York Times

Off the 18th green, Alex was greeted with a hug from her first-grade teacher before declining to provide a detailed answer to a question about whether the Americans’…

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